Should you be worried about cold flashes?

Cold flashes, hot flashes or both ?

Menopause and Perimenopause

Cheryl Vincelette
Audrey Sckoropad
@AVogel_ca


29 October 2021

What are cold flashes?

A cold flash tends to suddenly come over your body and is felt through tingling, shivering and an overall cold feeling. It is temporary and only lasts no more than a few minutes.

Although it is something that happens in the case of menopausal women, cold flashes can happen to people with anxiety, which can cause insomnia and even more anxious thoughts.

How do hot and cold flashes occur?

As estrogen levels drop during the menopausal years, the part of your brain (the hypothalamus) responsible for regulating your body temperature becomes overly sensitive, and therefore temperature regulation can be unstable.

Cold flashes can also be triggered by a panic attack or anxiety. During a panic attack, your body releases adrenaline and other stress hormones that can affect its ability to regulate body temperature.

What to do when a cold flash happens?

  • Be ready by always having an extra warm sweater and blanket in your car and office space. A heating blanket can definitely bring immediate comfort as the direct heat is better than just another layer of clothes for warming up.
  • Get your body moving. If you increase blood flow by moving, it can help heat you up quicker. If you're sitting, stand up, start walking, maybe do a few squats.
  • Put warm socks on. Especially if you tend to get cold flashes during the night, wearing socks can help.

Lifestyle changes that can help

If your cold flashes are one of the symptoms you experience during perimenopause and menopause, here are some tips that may help:;

  • Limit caffeine and alcohol. Not only can they disrupt your sleep, then tend to also influence your body's temperature regulation system.
  • Exercise daily. This doesn't have to be at maximum effort, it means getting at least 20 min of moving your body. Such as, walking, dancing, working out, running, yoga, etc. Endorphins are a natural mood booster, and regular exercise can help you get the proper amount of REM sleep.
  • Get good sleep. While some of the depression, mental fogginess, and mood changes that accompany menopause are caused by hormone fluctuation, lack of sleep can make these symptoms worse. Deep REM sleep combats stress hormone production and allows your mind to rest and heal.
  • Having a healthy diet is also important. Not only does it reduce your odds of developing cardiovascular disease, but it also curbs the weight gain many women experience during menopause. Besides filling your meals with whole foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables, don't forget to use healthy fats such as cold pressed oils in your salad dressings and some healthy seasonings. A balanced and flavorful salt to cook with is the Herbamare sea salt. It is made with organic sea salt and freshly dried herbs and vegetables. Read more about diet and menopause.
  • The use of supplements is key to make sure you're getting the needed nutrients for proper hormonal balance and overall health. Don't forget vitamin D and extra calcium for long term bone health. There is also A.Vogel's MenoSupport Complex which contains soy extract, magnesium, hibiscus and verbena made to help you effectively manage the multiple symptoms of menopause.
  • Find ways to relax and manage stress. Do yoga, take a moment a day to take a few deep and conscious breaths, walk in nature, etc. If you know you'll be experiencing a stressful day and want to stay calm ahead, making a list of what needs to be done can unload your mental charge.
  • Herbal remedies such as A.Vogel's Relax Oral Spray can be another great ally. It has been shown to help with nervousness, restlessness, agitation and irritability and Passion Flower is renowned for helping with insomnia.

If you're worried about your cold flashes and / or have just started to experience them, and feel like they affect your quality of life, talk to your doctor or health practitioner.

Sources

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4167790/
https://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flashes#cold-flashes-and-pregnancy
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11167210/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507826/